googletest repository

Repository Summary

Checkout URI https://github.com/ament/googletest.git
VCS Type git
VCS Version ros2
Last Updated 2019-05-08
Dev Status MAINTAINED
CI status No Continuous Integration
Released RELEASED
Package Tags No category tags.
Contributing Help Wanted (0)
Good First Issues (0)
Pull Requests to Review (0)

Packages

Name Version
gmock_vendor 1.8.9000
gtest_vendor 1.8.9000

README

Google Test

Build Status Build status

Future Plans: * 1.8.x Release - the 1.8.x is the last release that works with pre-C++11 compilers. The 1.8.x will not accept any requests for any new features and any bugfix requests will only be accepted if proven "critical" * Post 1.8.x - work to improve/cleanup/pay technical debt. When this work is completed there will be a 1.9.x tagged release * Post 1.9.x googletest will follow Abseil Live at Head philosophy

Welcome to Google Test, Google's C++ test framework!

This repository is a merger of the formerly separate GoogleTest and GoogleMock projects. These were so closely related that it makes sense to maintain and release them together.

Please the mailing list at googletestframework@googlegroups.com for questions, discussions, and development.
There is also an IRC channel on OFTC (irc.oftc.net) #gtest available.

Getting started information for Google Test is available in the Google Test Primer documentation.

Google Mock is an extension to Google Test for writing and using C++ mock classes. See the separate Google Mock documentation.

More detailed documentation for googletest (including build instructions) are in its interior googletest/README.md file.

Features

  • An xUnit test framework.
  • Test discovery.
  • A rich set of assertions.
  • User-defined assertions.
  • Death tests.
  • Fatal and non-fatal failures.
  • Value-parameterized tests.
  • Type-parameterized tests.
  • Various options for running the tests.
  • XML test report generation.

Platforms

Google test has been used on a variety of platforms:

  • Linux
  • Mac OS X
  • Windows
  • Cygwin
  • MinGW
  • Windows Mobile
  • Symbian

Who Is Using Google Test?

In addition to many internal projects at Google, Google Test is also used by the following notable projects:

GTest Runner is a Qt5 based automated test-runner and Graphical User Interface with powerful features for Windows and Linux platforms.

Google Test UI is test runner that runs your test binary, allows you to track its progress via a progress bar, and displays a list of test failures. Clicking on one shows failure text. Google Test UI is written in C#.

GTest TAP Listener is an event listener for Google Test that implements the TAP protocol for test result output. If your test runner understands TAP, you may find it useful.

gtest-parallel is a test runner that runs tests from your binary in parallel to provide significant speed-up.

GoogleTest Adapter is a VS Code extension allowing to view Google Tests in a tree view, and run/debug your tests.

Requirements

Google Test is designed to have fairly minimal requirements to build and use with your projects, but there are some. Currently, we support Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, and Cygwin. We will also make our best effort to support other platforms (e.g. Solaris, AIX, and z/OS). However, since core members of the Google Test project have no access to these platforms, Google Test may have outstanding issues there. If you notice any problems on your platform, please notify googletestframework@googlegroups.com. Patches for fixing them are even more welcome!

Linux Requirements

These are the base requirements to build and use Google Test from a source package (as described below):

  • GNU-compatible Make or gmake
  • POSIX-standard shell
  • POSIX(-2) Regular Expressions (regex.h)
  • A C++11-standard-compliant compiler

Windows Requirements

  • Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 or newer

Cygwin Requirements

  • Cygwin v1.5.25-14 or newer

Mac OS X Requirements

  • Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger or newer
  • Xcode Developer Tools

Contributing change

Please read the CONTRIBUTING.md for details on how to contribute to this project.

Happy testing!

CONTRIBUTING

How to become a contributor and submit your own code

Contributor License Agreements

We'd love to accept your patches! Before we can take them, we have to jump a couple of legal hurdles.

Please fill out either the individual or corporate Contributor License Agreement (CLA).

  • If you are an individual writing original source code and you're sure you own the intellectual property, then you'll need to sign an individual CLA.
  • If you work for a company that wants to allow you to contribute your work, then you'll need to sign a corporate CLA.

Follow either of the two links above to access the appropriate CLA and instructions for how to sign and return it. Once we receive it, we'll be able to accept your pull requests.

Are you a Googler?

If you are a Googler, you can either create an internal change or work on GitHub directly.

Contributing A Patch

  1. Submit an issue describing your proposed change to the issue tracker.
  2. Please don't mix more than one logical change per submittal, because it makes the history hard to follow. If you want to make a change that doesn't have a corresponding issue in the issue tracker, please create one.
  3. Also, coordinate with team members that are listed on the issue in question. This ensures that work isn't being duplicated and communicating your plan early also generally leads to better patches.
  4. If your proposed change is accepted, and you haven't already done so, sign a Contributor License Agreement (see details above).
  5. Fork the desired repo, develop and test your code changes.
  6. Ensure that your code adheres to the existing style in the sample to which you are contributing.
  7. Ensure that your code has an appropriate set of unit tests which all pass.
  8. Submit a pull request.

The Google Test and Google Mock Communities

The Google Test community exists primarily through the discussion group and the GitHub repository. Likewise, the Google Mock community exists primarily through their own discussion group. You are definitely encouraged to contribute to the discussion and you can also help us to keep the effectiveness of the group high by following and promoting the guidelines listed here.

Please Be Friendly

Showing courtesy and respect to others is a vital part of the Google culture, and we strongly encourage everyone participating in Google Test development to join us in accepting nothing less. Of course, being courteous is not the same as failing to constructively disagree with each other, but it does mean that we should be respectful of each other when enumerating the 42 technical reasons that a particular proposal may not be the best choice. There's never a reason to be antagonistic or dismissive toward anyone who is sincerely trying to contribute to a discussion.

Sure, C++ testing is serious business and all that, but it's also a lot of fun. Let's keep it that way. Let's strive to be one of the friendliest communities in all of open source.

As always, discuss Google Test in the official GoogleTest discussion group. You don't have to actually submit code in order to sign up. Your participation itself is a valuable contribution.

Style

To keep the source consistent, readable, diffable and easy to merge, we use a fairly rigid coding style, as defined by the google-styleguide project. All patches will be expected to conform to the style outlined here. Use .clang-format to check your formatting

Requirements for Contributors

If you plan to contribute a patch, you need to build Google Test, Google Mock, and their own tests from a git checkout, which has further requirements:

  • Python v2.3 or newer (for running some of the tests and re-generating certain source files from templates)
  • CMake v2.6.4 or newer
  • GNU Build System including automake (>= 1.9), autoconf (>= 2.59), and libtool / libtoolize.

Developing Google Test

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Test.

Testing Google Test Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you can use CMake:

mkdir mybuild
cd mybuild
cmake -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Make sure you have Python installed, as some of Google Test's tests are written in Python. If the cmake command complains about not being able to find Python (Could NOT find PythonInterp (missing: PYTHON_EXECUTABLE)), try telling it explicitly where your Python executable can be found:

cmake -DPYTHON_EXECUTABLE=path/to/python -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Next, you can build Google Test and all of its own tests. On *nix, this is usually done by 'make'. To run the tests, do

make test

All tests should pass.

Regenerating Source Files

Some of Google Test's source files are generated from templates (not in the C++ sense) using a script. For example, the file include/gtest/internal/gtest-type-util.h.pump is used to generate gtest-type-util.h in the same directory.

You don't need to worry about regenerating the source files unless you need to modify them. You would then modify the corresponding .pump files and run the 'pump.py' generator script. See the Pump Manual.

Developing Google Mock

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Mock.

Testing Google Mock Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you'll need Autotools. First, make sure you have followed the instructions above to configure Google Mock. Then, create a build output directory and enter it. Next,

${GMOCK_DIR}/configure  # try --help for more info

Once you have successfully configured Google Mock, the build steps are standard for GNU-style OSS packages.

make        # Standard makefile following GNU conventions
make check  # Builds and runs all tests - all should pass.

Note that when building your project against Google Mock, you are building against Google Test as well. There is no need to configure Google Test separately.


Repository Summary

Checkout URI https://github.com/ament/googletest.git
VCS Type git
VCS Version dashing
Last Updated 2019-05-08
Dev Status MAINTAINED
CI status No Continuous Integration
Released RELEASED
Package Tags No category tags.
Contributing Help Wanted (0)
Good First Issues (0)
Pull Requests to Review (0)

Packages

Name Version
gmock_vendor 1.8.9000
gtest_vendor 1.8.9000

README

Google Test

Build Status Build status

Future Plans: * 1.8.x Release - the 1.8.x is the last release that works with pre-C++11 compilers. The 1.8.x will not accept any requests for any new features and any bugfix requests will only be accepted if proven "critical" * Post 1.8.x - work to improve/cleanup/pay technical debt. When this work is completed there will be a 1.9.x tagged release * Post 1.9.x googletest will follow Abseil Live at Head philosophy

Welcome to Google Test, Google's C++ test framework!

This repository is a merger of the formerly separate GoogleTest and GoogleMock projects. These were so closely related that it makes sense to maintain and release them together.

Please the mailing list at googletestframework@googlegroups.com for questions, discussions, and development.
There is also an IRC channel on OFTC (irc.oftc.net) #gtest available.

Getting started information for Google Test is available in the Google Test Primer documentation.

Google Mock is an extension to Google Test for writing and using C++ mock classes. See the separate Google Mock documentation.

More detailed documentation for googletest (including build instructions) are in its interior googletest/README.md file.

Features

  • An xUnit test framework.
  • Test discovery.
  • A rich set of assertions.
  • User-defined assertions.
  • Death tests.
  • Fatal and non-fatal failures.
  • Value-parameterized tests.
  • Type-parameterized tests.
  • Various options for running the tests.
  • XML test report generation.

Platforms

Google test has been used on a variety of platforms:

  • Linux
  • Mac OS X
  • Windows
  • Cygwin
  • MinGW
  • Windows Mobile
  • Symbian

Who Is Using Google Test?

In addition to many internal projects at Google, Google Test is also used by the following notable projects:

GTest Runner is a Qt5 based automated test-runner and Graphical User Interface with powerful features for Windows and Linux platforms.

Google Test UI is test runner that runs your test binary, allows you to track its progress via a progress bar, and displays a list of test failures. Clicking on one shows failure text. Google Test UI is written in C#.

GTest TAP Listener is an event listener for Google Test that implements the TAP protocol for test result output. If your test runner understands TAP, you may find it useful.

gtest-parallel is a test runner that runs tests from your binary in parallel to provide significant speed-up.

GoogleTest Adapter is a VS Code extension allowing to view Google Tests in a tree view, and run/debug your tests.

Requirements

Google Test is designed to have fairly minimal requirements to build and use with your projects, but there are some. Currently, we support Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, and Cygwin. We will also make our best effort to support other platforms (e.g. Solaris, AIX, and z/OS). However, since core members of the Google Test project have no access to these platforms, Google Test may have outstanding issues there. If you notice any problems on your platform, please notify googletestframework@googlegroups.com. Patches for fixing them are even more welcome!

Linux Requirements

These are the base requirements to build and use Google Test from a source package (as described below):

  • GNU-compatible Make or gmake
  • POSIX-standard shell
  • POSIX(-2) Regular Expressions (regex.h)
  • A C++11-standard-compliant compiler

Windows Requirements

  • Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 or newer

Cygwin Requirements

  • Cygwin v1.5.25-14 or newer

Mac OS X Requirements

  • Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger or newer
  • Xcode Developer Tools

Contributing change

Please read the CONTRIBUTING.md for details on how to contribute to this project.

Happy testing!

CONTRIBUTING

How to become a contributor and submit your own code

Contributor License Agreements

We'd love to accept your patches! Before we can take them, we have to jump a couple of legal hurdles.

Please fill out either the individual or corporate Contributor License Agreement (CLA).

  • If you are an individual writing original source code and you're sure you own the intellectual property, then you'll need to sign an individual CLA.
  • If you work for a company that wants to allow you to contribute your work, then you'll need to sign a corporate CLA.

Follow either of the two links above to access the appropriate CLA and instructions for how to sign and return it. Once we receive it, we'll be able to accept your pull requests.

Are you a Googler?

If you are a Googler, you can either create an internal change or work on GitHub directly.

Contributing A Patch

  1. Submit an issue describing your proposed change to the issue tracker.
  2. Please don't mix more than one logical change per submittal, because it makes the history hard to follow. If you want to make a change that doesn't have a corresponding issue in the issue tracker, please create one.
  3. Also, coordinate with team members that are listed on the issue in question. This ensures that work isn't being duplicated and communicating your plan early also generally leads to better patches.
  4. If your proposed change is accepted, and you haven't already done so, sign a Contributor License Agreement (see details above).
  5. Fork the desired repo, develop and test your code changes.
  6. Ensure that your code adheres to the existing style in the sample to which you are contributing.
  7. Ensure that your code has an appropriate set of unit tests which all pass.
  8. Submit a pull request.

The Google Test and Google Mock Communities

The Google Test community exists primarily through the discussion group and the GitHub repository. Likewise, the Google Mock community exists primarily through their own discussion group. You are definitely encouraged to contribute to the discussion and you can also help us to keep the effectiveness of the group high by following and promoting the guidelines listed here.

Please Be Friendly

Showing courtesy and respect to others is a vital part of the Google culture, and we strongly encourage everyone participating in Google Test development to join us in accepting nothing less. Of course, being courteous is not the same as failing to constructively disagree with each other, but it does mean that we should be respectful of each other when enumerating the 42 technical reasons that a particular proposal may not be the best choice. There's never a reason to be antagonistic or dismissive toward anyone who is sincerely trying to contribute to a discussion.

Sure, C++ testing is serious business and all that, but it's also a lot of fun. Let's keep it that way. Let's strive to be one of the friendliest communities in all of open source.

As always, discuss Google Test in the official GoogleTest discussion group. You don't have to actually submit code in order to sign up. Your participation itself is a valuable contribution.

Style

To keep the source consistent, readable, diffable and easy to merge, we use a fairly rigid coding style, as defined by the google-styleguide project. All patches will be expected to conform to the style outlined here. Use .clang-format to check your formatting

Requirements for Contributors

If you plan to contribute a patch, you need to build Google Test, Google Mock, and their own tests from a git checkout, which has further requirements:

  • Python v2.3 or newer (for running some of the tests and re-generating certain source files from templates)
  • CMake v2.6.4 or newer
  • GNU Build System including automake (>= 1.9), autoconf (>= 2.59), and libtool / libtoolize.

Developing Google Test

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Test.

Testing Google Test Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you can use CMake:

mkdir mybuild
cd mybuild
cmake -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Make sure you have Python installed, as some of Google Test's tests are written in Python. If the cmake command complains about not being able to find Python (Could NOT find PythonInterp (missing: PYTHON_EXECUTABLE)), try telling it explicitly where your Python executable can be found:

cmake -DPYTHON_EXECUTABLE=path/to/python -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Next, you can build Google Test and all of its own tests. On *nix, this is usually done by 'make'. To run the tests, do

make test

All tests should pass.

Regenerating Source Files

Some of Google Test's source files are generated from templates (not in the C++ sense) using a script. For example, the file include/gtest/internal/gtest-type-util.h.pump is used to generate gtest-type-util.h in the same directory.

You don't need to worry about regenerating the source files unless you need to modify them. You would then modify the corresponding .pump files and run the 'pump.py' generator script. See the Pump Manual.

Developing Google Mock

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Mock.

Testing Google Mock Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you'll need Autotools. First, make sure you have followed the instructions above to configure Google Mock. Then, create a build output directory and enter it. Next,

${GMOCK_DIR}/configure  # try --help for more info

Once you have successfully configured Google Mock, the build steps are standard for GNU-style OSS packages.

make        # Standard makefile following GNU conventions
make check  # Builds and runs all tests - all should pass.

Note that when building your project against Google Mock, you are building against Google Test as well. There is no need to configure Google Test separately.


Repository Summary

Checkout URI https://github.com/ament/googletest.git
VCS Type git
VCS Version ardent
Last Updated 2017-08-08
Dev Status MAINTAINED
CI status No Continuous Integration
Released RELEASED
Package Tags No category tags.
Contributing Help Wanted (0)
Good First Issues (0)
Pull Requests to Review (0)

Packages

Name Version
gmock_vendor 1.8.0
gtest_vendor 1.8.0

README

Google Test

Build Status Build status

Welcome to Google Test, Google's C++ test framework!

This repository is a merger of the formerly separate GoogleTest and GoogleMock projects. These were so closely related that it makes sense to maintain and release them together.

Please see the project page above for more information as well as the mailing list for questions, discussions, and development. There is also an IRC channel on OFTC (irc.oftc.net) #gtest available. Please join us!

Getting started information for Google Test is available in the Google Test Primer documentation.

Google Mock is an extension to Google Test for writing and using C++ mock classes. See the separate Google Mock documentation.

More detailed documentation for googletest (including build instructions) are in its interior googletest/README.md file.

Features

  • An XUnit test framework.
  • Test discovery.
  • A rich set of assertions.
  • User-defined assertions.
  • Death tests.
  • Fatal and non-fatal failures.
  • Value-parameterized tests.
  • Type-parameterized tests.
  • Various options for running the tests.
  • XML test report generation.

Platforms

Google test has been used on a variety of platforms:

  • Linux
  • Mac OS X
  • Windows
  • Cygwin
  • MinGW
  • Windows Mobile
  • Symbian

Who Is Using Google Test?

In addition to many internal projects at Google, Google Test is also used by the following notable projects:

Google Test UI is test runner that runs your test binary, allows you to track its progress via a progress bar, and displays a list of test failures. Clicking on one shows failure text. Google Test UI is written in C#.

GTest TAP Listener is an event listener for Google Test that implements the TAP protocol for test result output. If your test runner understands TAP, you may find it useful.

Requirements

Google Test is designed to have fairly minimal requirements to build and use with your projects, but there are some. Currently, we support Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, and Cygwin. We will also make our best effort to support other platforms (e.g. Solaris, AIX, and z/OS). However, since core members of the Google Test project have no access to these platforms, Google Test may have outstanding issues there. If you notice any problems on your platform, please notify googletestframework@googlegroups.com. Patches for fixing them are even more welcome!

Linux Requirements

These are the base requirements to build and use Google Test from a source package (as described below):

  • GNU-compatible Make or gmake
  • POSIX-standard shell
  • POSIX(-2) Regular Expressions (regex.h)
  • A C++98-standard-compliant compiler

Windows Requirements

  • Microsoft Visual C++ v7.1 or newer

Cygwin Requirements

  • Cygwin v1.5.25-14 or newer

Mac OS X Requirements

  • Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger or newer
  • Xcode Developer Tools

Requirements for Contributors

We welcome patches. If you plan to contribute a patch, you need to build Google Test and its own tests from a git checkout (described below), which has further requirements:

  • Python v2.3 or newer (for running some of the tests and re-generating certain source files from templates)
  • CMake v2.6.4 or newer

Regenerating Source Files

Some of Google Test's source files are generated from templates (not in the C++ sense) using a script. For example, the file include/gtest/internal/gtest-type-util.h.pump is used to generate gtest-type-util.h in the same directory.

You don't need to worry about regenerating the source files unless you need to modify them. You would then modify the corresponding .pump files and run the 'pump.py' generator script. See the Pump Manual.

Contributing Code

We welcome patches. Please read the Developer's Guide for how you can contribute. In particular, make sure you have signed the Contributor License Agreement, or we won't be able to accept the patch.

Happy testing!

CONTRIBUTING

No CONTRIBUTING.md found.

Repository Summary

Checkout URI https://github.com/ament/googletest.git
VCS Type git
VCS Version ros2
Last Updated 2019-05-08
Dev Status MAINTAINED
CI status No Continuous Integration
Released RELEASED
Package Tags No category tags.
Contributing Help Wanted (0)
Good First Issues (0)
Pull Requests to Review (0)

Packages

Name Version
gmock_vendor 1.8.9000
gtest_vendor 1.8.9000

README

Google Test

Build Status Build status

Future Plans: * 1.8.x Release - the 1.8.x is the last release that works with pre-C++11 compilers. The 1.8.x will not accept any requests for any new features and any bugfix requests will only be accepted if proven "critical" * Post 1.8.x - work to improve/cleanup/pay technical debt. When this work is completed there will be a 1.9.x tagged release * Post 1.9.x googletest will follow Abseil Live at Head philosophy

Welcome to Google Test, Google's C++ test framework!

This repository is a merger of the formerly separate GoogleTest and GoogleMock projects. These were so closely related that it makes sense to maintain and release them together.

Please the mailing list at googletestframework@googlegroups.com for questions, discussions, and development.
There is also an IRC channel on OFTC (irc.oftc.net) #gtest available.

Getting started information for Google Test is available in the Google Test Primer documentation.

Google Mock is an extension to Google Test for writing and using C++ mock classes. See the separate Google Mock documentation.

More detailed documentation for googletest (including build instructions) are in its interior googletest/README.md file.

Features

  • An xUnit test framework.
  • Test discovery.
  • A rich set of assertions.
  • User-defined assertions.
  • Death tests.
  • Fatal and non-fatal failures.
  • Value-parameterized tests.
  • Type-parameterized tests.
  • Various options for running the tests.
  • XML test report generation.

Platforms

Google test has been used on a variety of platforms:

  • Linux
  • Mac OS X
  • Windows
  • Cygwin
  • MinGW
  • Windows Mobile
  • Symbian

Who Is Using Google Test?

In addition to many internal projects at Google, Google Test is also used by the following notable projects:

GTest Runner is a Qt5 based automated test-runner and Graphical User Interface with powerful features for Windows and Linux platforms.

Google Test UI is test runner that runs your test binary, allows you to track its progress via a progress bar, and displays a list of test failures. Clicking on one shows failure text. Google Test UI is written in C#.

GTest TAP Listener is an event listener for Google Test that implements the TAP protocol for test result output. If your test runner understands TAP, you may find it useful.

gtest-parallel is a test runner that runs tests from your binary in parallel to provide significant speed-up.

GoogleTest Adapter is a VS Code extension allowing to view Google Tests in a tree view, and run/debug your tests.

Requirements

Google Test is designed to have fairly minimal requirements to build and use with your projects, but there are some. Currently, we support Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, and Cygwin. We will also make our best effort to support other platforms (e.g. Solaris, AIX, and z/OS). However, since core members of the Google Test project have no access to these platforms, Google Test may have outstanding issues there. If you notice any problems on your platform, please notify googletestframework@googlegroups.com. Patches for fixing them are even more welcome!

Linux Requirements

These are the base requirements to build and use Google Test from a source package (as described below):

  • GNU-compatible Make or gmake
  • POSIX-standard shell
  • POSIX(-2) Regular Expressions (regex.h)
  • A C++11-standard-compliant compiler

Windows Requirements

  • Microsoft Visual C++ 2015 or newer

Cygwin Requirements

  • Cygwin v1.5.25-14 or newer

Mac OS X Requirements

  • Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger or newer
  • Xcode Developer Tools

Contributing change

Please read the CONTRIBUTING.md for details on how to contribute to this project.

Happy testing!

CONTRIBUTING

How to become a contributor and submit your own code

Contributor License Agreements

We'd love to accept your patches! Before we can take them, we have to jump a couple of legal hurdles.

Please fill out either the individual or corporate Contributor License Agreement (CLA).

  • If you are an individual writing original source code and you're sure you own the intellectual property, then you'll need to sign an individual CLA.
  • If you work for a company that wants to allow you to contribute your work, then you'll need to sign a corporate CLA.

Follow either of the two links above to access the appropriate CLA and instructions for how to sign and return it. Once we receive it, we'll be able to accept your pull requests.

Are you a Googler?

If you are a Googler, you can either create an internal change or work on GitHub directly.

Contributing A Patch

  1. Submit an issue describing your proposed change to the issue tracker.
  2. Please don't mix more than one logical change per submittal, because it makes the history hard to follow. If you want to make a change that doesn't have a corresponding issue in the issue tracker, please create one.
  3. Also, coordinate with team members that are listed on the issue in question. This ensures that work isn't being duplicated and communicating your plan early also generally leads to better patches.
  4. If your proposed change is accepted, and you haven't already done so, sign a Contributor License Agreement (see details above).
  5. Fork the desired repo, develop and test your code changes.
  6. Ensure that your code adheres to the existing style in the sample to which you are contributing.
  7. Ensure that your code has an appropriate set of unit tests which all pass.
  8. Submit a pull request.

The Google Test and Google Mock Communities

The Google Test community exists primarily through the discussion group and the GitHub repository. Likewise, the Google Mock community exists primarily through their own discussion group. You are definitely encouraged to contribute to the discussion and you can also help us to keep the effectiveness of the group high by following and promoting the guidelines listed here.

Please Be Friendly

Showing courtesy and respect to others is a vital part of the Google culture, and we strongly encourage everyone participating in Google Test development to join us in accepting nothing less. Of course, being courteous is not the same as failing to constructively disagree with each other, but it does mean that we should be respectful of each other when enumerating the 42 technical reasons that a particular proposal may not be the best choice. There's never a reason to be antagonistic or dismissive toward anyone who is sincerely trying to contribute to a discussion.

Sure, C++ testing is serious business and all that, but it's also a lot of fun. Let's keep it that way. Let's strive to be one of the friendliest communities in all of open source.

As always, discuss Google Test in the official GoogleTest discussion group. You don't have to actually submit code in order to sign up. Your participation itself is a valuable contribution.

Style

To keep the source consistent, readable, diffable and easy to merge, we use a fairly rigid coding style, as defined by the google-styleguide project. All patches will be expected to conform to the style outlined here. Use .clang-format to check your formatting

Requirements for Contributors

If you plan to contribute a patch, you need to build Google Test, Google Mock, and their own tests from a git checkout, which has further requirements:

  • Python v2.3 or newer (for running some of the tests and re-generating certain source files from templates)
  • CMake v2.6.4 or newer
  • GNU Build System including automake (>= 1.9), autoconf (>= 2.59), and libtool / libtoolize.

Developing Google Test

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Test.

Testing Google Test Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you can use CMake:

mkdir mybuild
cd mybuild
cmake -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Make sure you have Python installed, as some of Google Test's tests are written in Python. If the cmake command complains about not being able to find Python (Could NOT find PythonInterp (missing: PYTHON_EXECUTABLE)), try telling it explicitly where your Python executable can be found:

cmake -DPYTHON_EXECUTABLE=path/to/python -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Next, you can build Google Test and all of its own tests. On *nix, this is usually done by 'make'. To run the tests, do

make test

All tests should pass.

Regenerating Source Files

Some of Google Test's source files are generated from templates (not in the C++ sense) using a script. For example, the file include/gtest/internal/gtest-type-util.h.pump is used to generate gtest-type-util.h in the same directory.

You don't need to worry about regenerating the source files unless you need to modify them. You would then modify the corresponding .pump files and run the 'pump.py' generator script. See the Pump Manual.

Developing Google Mock

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Mock.

Testing Google Mock Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you'll need Autotools. First, make sure you have followed the instructions above to configure Google Mock. Then, create a build output directory and enter it. Next,

${GMOCK_DIR}/configure  # try --help for more info

Once you have successfully configured Google Mock, the build steps are standard for GNU-style OSS packages.

make        # Standard makefile following GNU conventions
make check  # Builds and runs all tests - all should pass.

Note that when building your project against Google Mock, you are building against Google Test as well. There is no need to configure Google Test separately.


Repository Summary

Checkout URI https://github.com/ament/googletest.git
VCS Type git
VCS Version crystal
Last Updated 2019-01-04
Dev Status MAINTAINED
CI status No Continuous Integration
Released RELEASED
Package Tags No category tags.
Contributing Help Wanted (0)
Good First Issues (0)
Pull Requests to Review (0)

Packages

Name Version
gmock_vendor 1.8.0
gtest_vendor 1.8.0

README

Google Test

Build Status Build status

Welcome to Google Test, Google's C++ test framework!

This repository is a merger of the formerly separate GoogleTest and GoogleMock projects. These were so closely related that it makes sense to maintain and release them together.

Please see the project page above for more information as well as the mailing list for questions, discussions, and development. There is also an IRC channel on OFTC (irc.oftc.net) #gtest available. Please join us!

Getting started information for Google Test is available in the Google Test Primer documentation.

Google Mock is an extension to Google Test for writing and using C++ mock classes. See the separate Google Mock documentation.

More detailed documentation for googletest (including build instructions) are in its interior googletest/README.md file.

Features

  • An xUnit test framework.
  • Test discovery.
  • A rich set of assertions.
  • User-defined assertions.
  • Death tests.
  • Fatal and non-fatal failures.
  • Value-parameterized tests.
  • Type-parameterized tests.
  • Various options for running the tests.
  • XML test report generation.

Platforms

Google test has been used on a variety of platforms:

  • Linux
  • Mac OS X
  • Windows
  • Cygwin
  • MinGW
  • Windows Mobile
  • Symbian

Who Is Using Google Test?

In addition to many internal projects at Google, Google Test is also used by the following notable projects:

GTest Runner is a Qt5 based automated test-runner and Graphical User Interface with powerful features for Windows and Linux platforms.

Google Test UI is test runner that runs your test binary, allows you to track its progress via a progress bar, and displays a list of test failures. Clicking on one shows failure text. Google Test UI is written in C#.

GTest TAP Listener is an event listener for Google Test that implements the TAP protocol for test result output. If your test runner understands TAP, you may find it useful.

gtest-parallel is a test runner that runs tests from your binary in parallel to provide significant speed-up.

Requirements

Google Test is designed to have fairly minimal requirements to build and use with your projects, but there are some. Currently, we support Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, and Cygwin. We will also make our best effort to support other platforms (e.g. Solaris, AIX, and z/OS). However, since core members of the Google Test project have no access to these platforms, Google Test may have outstanding issues there. If you notice any problems on your platform, please notify googletestframework@googlegroups.com. Patches for fixing them are even more welcome!

Linux Requirements

These are the base requirements to build and use Google Test from a source package (as described below):

  • GNU-compatible Make or gmake
  • POSIX-standard shell
  • POSIX(-2) Regular Expressions (regex.h)
  • A C++98-standard-compliant compiler

Windows Requirements

  • Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 or newer

Cygwin Requirements

  • Cygwin v1.5.25-14 or newer

Mac OS X Requirements

  • Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger or newer
  • Xcode Developer Tools

Contributing change

Please read the CONTRIBUTING.md for details on how to contribute to this project.

Happy testing!

CONTRIBUTING

How to become a contributor and submit your own code

Contributor License Agreements

We'd love to accept your patches! Before we can take them, we have to jump a couple of legal hurdles.

Please fill out either the individual or corporate Contributor License Agreement (CLA).

  • If you are an individual writing original source code and you're sure you own the intellectual property, then you'll need to sign an individual CLA.
  • If you work for a company that wants to allow you to contribute your work, then you'll need to sign a corporate CLA.

Follow either of the two links above to access the appropriate CLA and instructions for how to sign and return it. Once we receive it, we'll be able to accept your pull requests.

Contributing A Patch

  1. Submit an issue describing your proposed change to the issue tracker.
  2. Please don't mix more than one logical change per submittal, because it makes the history hard to follow. If you want to make a change that doesn't have a corresponding issue in the issue tracker, please create one.
  3. Also, coordinate with team members that are listed on the issue in question. This ensures that work isn't being duplicated and communicating your plan early also generally leads to better patches.
  4. If your proposed change is accepted, and you haven't already done so, sign a Contributor License Agreement (see details above).
  5. Fork the desired repo, develop and test your code changes.
  6. Ensure that your code adheres to the existing style in the sample to which you are contributing.
  7. Ensure that your code has an appropriate set of unit tests which all pass.
  8. Submit a pull request.

If you are a Googler, it is preferable to first create an internal change and have it reviewed and submitted, and then create an upstreaming pull request here.

The Google Test and Google Mock Communities

The Google Test community exists primarily through the discussion group and the GitHub repository. Likewise, the Google Mock community exists primarily through their own discussion group. You are definitely encouraged to contribute to the discussion and you can also help us to keep the effectiveness of the group high by following and promoting the guidelines listed here.

Please Be Friendly

Showing courtesy and respect to others is a vital part of the Google culture, and we strongly encourage everyone participating in Google Test development to join us in accepting nothing less. Of course, being courteous is not the same as failing to constructively disagree with each other, but it does mean that we should be respectful of each other when enumerating the 42 technical reasons that a particular proposal may not be the best choice. There's never a reason to be antagonistic or dismissive toward anyone who is sincerely trying to contribute to a discussion.

Sure, C++ testing is serious business and all that, but it's also a lot of fun. Let's keep it that way. Let's strive to be one of the friendliest communities in all of open source.

As always, discuss Google Test in the official GoogleTest discussion group. You don't have to actually submit code in order to sign up. Your participation itself is a valuable contribution.

Style

To keep the source consistent, readable, diffable and easy to merge, we use a fairly rigid coding style, as defined by the google-styleguide project. All patches will be expected to conform to the style outlined here.

Requirements for Contributors

If you plan to contribute a patch, you need to build Google Test, Google Mock, and their own tests from a git checkout, which has further requirements:

  • Python v2.3 or newer (for running some of the tests and re-generating certain source files from templates)
  • CMake v2.6.4 or newer
  • GNU Build System including automake (>= 1.9), autoconf (>= 2.59), and libtool / libtoolize.

Developing Google Test

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Test.

Testing Google Test Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you can use CMake:

mkdir mybuild
cd mybuild
cmake -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Make sure you have Python installed, as some of Google Test's tests are written in Python. If the cmake command complains about not being able to find Python (Could NOT find PythonInterp (missing: PYTHON_EXECUTABLE)), try telling it explicitly where your Python executable can be found:

cmake -DPYTHON_EXECUTABLE=path/to/python -Dgtest_build_tests=ON ${GTEST_DIR}

Next, you can build Google Test and all of its own tests. On *nix, this is usually done by 'make'. To run the tests, do

make test

All tests should pass.

Regenerating Source Files

Some of Google Test's source files are generated from templates (not in the C++ sense) using a script. For example, the file include/gtest/internal/gtest-type-util.h.pump is used to generate gtest-type-util.h in the same directory.

You don't need to worry about regenerating the source files unless you need to modify them. You would then modify the corresponding .pump files and run the 'pump.py' generator script. See the Pump Manual.

Developing Google Mock

This section discusses how to make your own changes to Google Mock.

Testing Google Mock Itself

To make sure your changes work as intended and don't break existing functionality, you'll want to compile and run Google Test's own tests. For that you'll need Autotools. First, make sure you have followed the instructions above to configure Google Mock. Then, create a build output directory and enter it. Next,

${GMOCK_DIR}/configure  # try --help for more info

Once you have successfully configured Google Mock, the build steps are standard for GNU-style OSS packages.

make        # Standard makefile following GNU conventions
make check  # Builds and runs all tests - all should pass.

Note that when building your project against Google Mock, you are building against Google Test as well. There is no need to configure Google Test separately.